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The Neighborhood Gardener – November 2015

Happy autumn gardening!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Roselle calycesFlorida “Cranberries” – Wouldn’t it be great if your Thanksgiving cranberry sauce could come from ingredients grown in your own back yard? Ever heard of Florida cranberries? Well if you haven’t, the first thing you should know is they aren’t really cranberries at all. But don’t let that turn you off roselle, the plant that could provide you with the main ingredient to make your own tangy red, locally sourced holiday dressing.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — “That plant is invasive,” a gardener friend recently said to me. I asked her to be more specific, because I knew the plant she was referring to was a Florida native. “It just takes over everything!” She was right about the plant growing aggressively, but wrong in her use of the word “invasive.”

Master Gardener logoNew Master Gardener Website — We are happy to announce that the new Master Gardener website went live at the beginning of this month. The new site features beautiful and larger photos, easier navigation, and an updated design that may remind you a bit of the Gardening Solutions website.

SaltbushPlant of the Month: Saltbush — Saltbush, also called groundsel tree or sea myrtle, looks like a cloud of white flowers where you least expect it, hovering about 8 feet off the ground. Currently in bloom, you may have seen these often-overlooked shrubs blooming along roadsides and in ditches. While not commonly used in home landscapes, this native woody shrub is perfectly suited to Florida gardens.

November in Your Garden – With a rainier winter than average predicted this year, be on the lookout for plant disease and fungal problems in your landscape. For fall color, try some cool season annuals. North and Central Florida gardeners should try pansies and violas, while those further south should try strawflower and cape daisies.

Monarch on purple flowerFriend or Foe? Friend: Monarch Butterfly — The Monarch migration is underway! Many gardeners have heard by now that planting milkweed in their landscape is important to helping the Monarch butterflies survive, but many aren’t aware that the particular species you plant matters, as not all are Monarch host plants.

Read the full October issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – October 2015

Master Gardeners,

There’s still time to register for the 34th State Master Gardener Conference, October 18-21 in Kissimmee. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to hear our keynote speaker, photographer John Moran, or attend some of the 24 concurrent educational sessions.

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Pink dianthus flowerCut Flowers for Cool Weather – While thinking about all the yummy veggies you can grow and harvest in the fall, don’t forget about flowers! While most won’t be destined for your plate (although the pansies could be), flowers can still be harvested—for vases around your home. Bring some floral autumnal fun indoors with cool season bedding plants like dianthus (pictured), calendula, and more.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — This month we’re reporting on the Oriental fruit fly and the state of emergency associated with the insect in South Florida. You may think, “This doesn’t impact my garden or my landscape personally, so why should I care?” But as Floridians I think we should always care when there is a threat to our agriculture industry and our Florida farmers.

Map showing heavy rain for FloridaEl Niño — You may have heard that El Niño is back in the tropical Pacific Ocean, but what does that mean for your garden? El Niño events bring Florida a cooler and wetter winter, meaning you may find yourself dealing with more fungal diseases on plants, increased nutrient loss in the garden, and changes in the production of deciduous fruits, among other things

Yellow mumsPlant of the Month: Chrysanthemums — While the leaves of most Florida trees won’t give us those traditional autumnal colors, we can still paint our landscape with the colors of fall. Chrysanthemums, or mums, are easy to grow and come in a range of warm, welcoming hues. When buying potted mums, look for healthy, well-shaped plants with many flower buds. These perennials are cold hardy and prefer full sun, but can also thrive with just morning or afternoon sun.

October in Your Garden – October is a great time to be planting in the vegetable garden. Many herbs and vegetables thrive during Florida’s mild winter. What better way to know what to plant this and every month than with a handy-dandy infographic. See what vegetables to plant, broken down by area of the state.

Oriental fruit flyFriend or Foe? Foe: Oriental Fruit Fly — The Oriental fruit fly infestation in Miami-Dade County has become a problem warranting the declaration of a state of agricultural emergency. While this may not directly impact your home garden at the moment, an infestation here in Florida could be devastating. Read more about the Oriental fruit fly and what is being done to keep this aggressive pest in check by visiting Fresh from Florida.

Read the full October issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

Pest Alert: Oriental Fruit Fly in Miami-Dade

MIAMI, Fla.—Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam today declared a state of agricultural emergency due to the Oriental Fruit Fly infestation in Miami-Dade County. The Oriental Fruit Fly is considered one of the most serious of the world’s fruit fly pests due to its potential economic harm. It attacks more than 430 different fruits, vegetables and nuts, including: avocado, mango, mamey, loquat, lychee, longon, dragon fruit, guava, papaya, sapodilla, banana and annona. The fruit flies lay their eggs in host fruits and vegetables. Since the first detection of the Oriental Fruit Fly on Aug. 26, 2015 in Miami-Dade County, a total of 158 flies have been detected, specifically in the Redland area (156), Kendall (1) and Miami (1).

Read the full announcement here.

The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), is a very destructive pest of fruit in areas where it occurs. It is established in numerous areas in Asia, and is often intercepted in the United States, sometimes establishing infestations that were previously eradicated. This fly lays its eggs in fruit, where larvae hatch and eat the fruit, ruining it.

The adult is noticeably larger than a house fly and usually has prominent yellow and dark brown to black markings on the thorax.

Read more about the oriental fruit fly in this UF/IFAS EDIS publication.

oriental fruit fly

A female oriental fruit fly laying her eggs in a papaya.

The Neighborhood Gardener – September 2015

Happy Gardening!

The deadline is approaching; you only have one more week to register for the 34th State Master Gardener Conference at the early bird rate. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to hear our keynote speaker from the Florida Wildlife Corridor or attend some of the 24 concurrent educational sessions.

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Chinese evergreen plantPlants That Clean the Air – With summer ending and school back in session, people are spending more time indoors and thinking about how that is affecting them. While many people know that having a houseplant in their home or office can cheer up the space, they may not know that it can also help clean the air. Many popular houseplants are actually quite good at removing toxins like formaldehyde and benzene.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — The Florida Master Gardener Volunteers that work with school gardens have a special place in my heart. It takes a huge amount of planning, planting, and heart to work with students and teachers in their school gardens, but payoffs are more than worth it. I understand just how much hard work and fun it can be helping young gardeners nurture a love of growing their own food.

calico flowerPlant of the Month: Calico Flower — Named for the mottled pattern on its blossoms, calico flower is native to Brazil. This vining plant climbs and covers chain link and wire structures well, transforming plain structures into a lovely green screen. It’s ideal for butterfly gardens, serving as the larval host plant to two types of swallowtail butterflies. Gardeners should plant this vine in a sunny location with well-drained soil.

September in Your Garden – September is a great time to divide and replant your perennials, such as daylilies and amaryllis, which have grown too large or need a little rejuvenation. Be sure to add organic matter to your new planting areas and keep weeds in check while the plants establish themselves.

web in treeFriend or Foe? Neither: Fall Webworm — While the fall webworm isn’t really a garden friend, neither is it a true pest. The nests these caterpillars build on the ends of tree branches may be unsightly, but they won’t last long in your landscape. Trying to rid your trees of these caterpillars can often cause more harm than leaving them be.

Read the full September issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – August 2015

Happy Summer Gardening!

Master Gardeners, don’t forget to register for the 34th Annual State Master Gardener Conference to be held this October.

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Fresh soil in raised bedSquare Foot Gardening – August is a great time to start planning your fall garden. There are so many ways to grow edible plants in your landscape. While many people are familiar with traditional rows of edible plants, square-foot gardening offers something a little different. Square-foot gardening allows you to make your vegetable garden more of a landscape feature.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — I have often joked with new Master Gardener classes that the MG program is a support group for plant addicts. We love trying new plants and seeing what boundaries we can push with them. I find myself going to the nursery just to see what is new to try. On a recent visit to a nursery in St. Johns County I bought a plant that is meant for zone 9B and I live in 8B. I guess like many gardeners I have “zone envy.”

Dr. Jack PayneUF Leader Writes About Wendy Wilber — Recently, Jack Payne wrote a great piece about our new State Master Gardener Coordinator, Wendy Wilber for an industry publication. Jack Payne is the Senior Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources and the administrative head of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the University of Florida. You can follow him on Twitter at @JackPayneIFAS, where he shares horticulture news, his thoughts on the state’s agriculture industry, photos of Florida’s natural resources, and more.

watermelonPlant of the Month: Watermelon — With winding vines and large ripe fruits, watermelon can take up quite a bit of room in the garden. If you have the space, it can be well worth the opportunity to have these delicious fruit treats right in your own back yard. If you missed planting your watermelon at the beginning of the year, August gives gardeners across the state another chance. Those in South Florida can even continue to plant through September.

August in Your Garden – Keep track of rainfall and be sure to adjust your irrigation accordingly. UF/IFAS even has an app to help you figure out how much water your lawn really needs.

moleFriend or Foe? Neither: Moles — Moles are really more of a nuisance animal than a true garden foe. While their tunneling is unsightly to many gardeners, the damage is usually aesthetic. Moles themselves do not intentionally harm plants. These tiny mammals tunnel through landscapes to find the soil insects and invertebrates that make up their diets. If you can learn to live with their tunnels, moles may actually do you a favor by eating potentially harmful insects like mole crickets, grubs, ants, and slugs.

Read the full August issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – July 2015

Wasp on flower

A pollinator wasp visits a partridge pea flower.

Happy Summer Gardening!

Master Gardeners, don’t forget to register for the 34th Annual State Master Gardener Conference to be held this October.

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Cute pollinator hotelPollinator Hotels – While some may run for the hills when anything with a stinger flies by, gardeners know that it might be a helpful pollinator. Having pollinators like bees and wasps set up their home right in your garden can be great for your plants. And while you can’t tell a bee where to nest, you can provide pollinators with an ideal structure should they decide to move in—a pollinator hotel.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — Whew! Is it too hot to garden? Floridian gardeners have to be as heat tolerant as our plants and come up with our own summertime coping techniques. We sneak out early or venture out once the sun goes down.

Dr. David ShiblesDavid Shibles Retires as Polk MG Coordinator — Dr. David Shibles retired last month after 15 years as the Master Gardener Coordinator for Polk County. Dr. Shibles took a program with only two members when he arrived and turned it into an active organization with more than 100 members. As Lakeland’s Ledger.com reports, he leaves behind a “green legacy.”

Red royal Poinciana flowerPlant of the Month: Royal Poinciana — Royal poinciana (Delonix regia) provides South Florida landscapes with dappled shade in summer with wide, spreading branches and brilliantly-colored flowers. It prefers frost-free areas and will grow in a variety of soil conditions. With a potential height of 40 feet and a canopy as wide or even wider, many find that royal poinciana is best for larger landscapes.

July in Your Garden – While some may find it too hot to work in the garden right now, you can put the climbing temperatures to use and solarize your garden. Effective solarization takes 4 to 6 weeks, so start now to get your garden ready for fall planting.

foamy spittlebug massFriend or Foe? Foe: Spittlebugs — Named for the frothy mass they produce as nymphs, spittlebugs can surge in numbers during rainy, warm months, feeding on plants and turfgrass, especially centipedegrass. On ornamental plants, these pests can be managed by spraying the plant with a good, strong stream of water. If your lawn is being damaged by these bugs, reduce thatch in your lawn and avoid overwatering as spittlebugs can’t survive a dry environment.

Read the full July issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – June 2015

Happy Summer Gardening!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

The 34th Annual State Master Gardener Conference – The highly anticipated State Master Gardener Conference will take place October 18-21, 2015. Whether this year’s conference will be your first or fifteenth, there will be something for all of Florida’s Master Gardeners. In addition to 24 educational sessions, there will be exciting keynote speakers including John Moran, one of Florida’s best landscape photographers.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — This month marks the beginning of summer. For Floridians, there are a lot of markers to the month of June—hurricane season, the end of the school year, the rainy season starting, and reaping the harvest of our spring gardens.

Uprooted treeRisky (Tree) Business — Making sure the trees surrounding your home are healthy is always important. Not only are unhealthy trees unattractive, they can be a serious safety hazard. But it’s equally important to remember that not all trees are a risk; they play a vital role in your landscape. The best way to determine if your trees are healthy is to contact a professional. But you can do some scouting in your own landscape and determine if some of your trees are a risk and should be looked at.

OleanderPlant of the Month: Oleander — Oleander (Nerium oleander) may have a bit of a bad-girl reputation, but it is a truly beautiful addition to the Florida landscape. All parts of the plant are toxic, so be sure to plant it far from small children and curious pets. Oleander will grow best in zones 9a-11 and can handle even the poorest of soils. Plant yours in full sunlight for ideal flowering, and while it is very drought-resistant, supplemental irrigation in the driest months will help your oleander thrive.

June in Your Garden – Many gardeners are wrapping up their spring garden harvests as temperatures start to climb. Cover crops are a great way to control weeds and add nutrients to the soil while you take a break from tending to your vegetable patch. Cowpeas, sunhemp, and sorghum are some popular annual summer cover crops.

caterpillarFriend or Foe? Foe: Oleander Caterpillars — Oleander moths are quite beautiful.They’re sometimes called polka-dot moths due to the spots on their bodies and wings. But it’s the larval stage you should keep an eye out for. Oleander caterpillars are voracious eaters and can quickly defoliate a plant. Removing larvae-infested foliage is the most environmentally friendly method of control.

Read the full June issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.


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