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The Neighborhood Gardener – June 2014

Happy June, gardeners!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Soil Solarization – Looking for a way to manage soil pests in your vegetable garden without using chemicals? Try soil solarization. With soil solarization, a sheet of plastic is used to cover the soil surface, trapping the heat and allowing the soil to reach temperatures that are lethal to many pests and weeds. When done effectively, soil solarization can reduce pest populations for three to four months, and in some cases even longer.

Crapemyrtle in church gardenTurning Sand into a Sacred Garden in Polk County — Even before she became a Master Gardener in Polk County, Molly Griner was working on gardens. Her church, Hope Presbyterian in Winter Haven was located on the site of a former orange grove, its “landscape” mostly sandy soil and grass. Through Molly’s efforts, it has been turned into a Florida-Friendly garden for church-goers and community visitors to meditate or pray while surrounded by nature.

pink crinum flowerPlant of the Month: Crinums — Crinum lilies are a hallmark of Southern gardens and have been cherished and cultivated by Florida gardeners for years. They’re known for their easygoing nature, growing for years on old home sites or cemeteries with little or no care. Plant your crinum bulbs up to their necks in partial shade for best results. They are equally at home in dry sandy soils and on moist pond banks.

June in Your Garden – Summer flowering shrubs like hibiscus, oleander, and crapemyrtle bloom on new growth; lightly prune often during warmer months to keep them blooming and looking sharp.

beetleFriend or Foe? Friend: Air Potato Leaf Beetle — While many people know about the invasive air potato vine, few are aware of air potato leaf beetles. Native to Asia, these beetles feed and develop only on air potato plants, posing no risk to other plant species. In 2012, air potato leaf beetles were released in Florida as a potential biological control of the aggressive air potato vine. Within three months of their release, extensive damage to air potato plants was observed at the initial release sites.

Read the full June issue.

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