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The Neighborhood Gardener – September 2014

Happy September, gardeners!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

rosemaryFall Herbs – Fall is right around the corner and this is a great time to plant an herb garden. There are many perennial herbs that can be started this time of year, including the ever-popular rosemary, sage, and thyme. There are also some great annual herbs that can be planted now, like cilantro and parsley.

 

Layering techniquePlant Propagation – There are many different ways to make new plants, and the best method will vary depending on the plant you are propagating. Air layering, cuttings, and plant division are different ways that you can take a plant you like in your garden (or a friend’s) and grow more.

 

red salviaPlant of the Month: Salvias — Salvias are great plants for bringing butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden and as a bonus, they have no serious pests. With hundreds of annual and perennial species coming in an array of colors and sizes, you can easily find one or more to complement your landscape. Most salvias perform best in full to partial sun, prefer well-drained soil, and are considered relatively drought tolerant.

September in Your Garden – Divide and replant perennials and bulbs that have grown too large or need rejuvenation. Add organic matter to planting beds and monitor water needs during establishment. Refresh flower beds with celosia or wax begonias for fall color.

Cuban treefrogFriend or Foe? Foe: Cuban Treefrog — Cuban treefrogs likely came to Florida as stowaways in shipping crates from the Caribbean. These frogs are considered an invasive species in Florida and have been observed eating native treefrogs. You can do your part by reporting, capturing, and humanely euthanizing these invasive jumpers. A good way to tell the difference between Cuban treefrogs and our natives is by size—native treefrogs will usually not be longer than 2.5 inches. When in doubt, take a picture of the frog in question and email it to the UF Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation for identification.

Read the full September issue.

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