The Neighborhood Gardener – August 2019

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Purple and white eggplantsSummer Vegetables, Part Deux – As far as the more common edible garden plants go, there isn’t much that can be planted in the heat of Florida’s summers. August is when the number of edible plants you can start growing begins to kick off again. For some plants you can start a second crop, like eggplants, peppers, and tomatoes. Gardeners in Central and South Florida can start growing okra in August. In North and Central Florida, August marks the time you can plant squash again. Check out the infographic on UF/IFAS Gardening Solutions for more information on the edible plants that can be planted in August.

Wide shallow planter filled with colorful plantsSucculent Garden DIY – We’ve created a fast and fun video tutorial on creating a succulent garden. You can use practically any container, just be sure it has drainage holes. Next add your soil; either use a mix intended for succulents or mix soil and sand in equal proportion. Then get to adding plants. For the best-looking planter, vary colors and textures. Don’t forget to include some succulents that will spill nicely over the edge of your container. Once you’re done, admire your efforts and be sure to give your newly planted succulents some water. Watch our video on YouTube.

Hand saw cutting at a small tree branchHurricane Pre-pruning — Hurricane season started in June, but as the summer progresses it starts to kick up more. Healthy trees are a key part of making sure your home and landscape are ready should a hurricane head your way. When in doubt, look for a certified arborist to prune your trees. As far as palms go, avoid anything called “hurricane pruning” as this will do more harm than help to your tree.

State Master Gardener program coordinator Wendy WilberWendy’s Wanderings — Why did I ever plant these vines in my landscape? Have you ever asked yourself this question? It rang in my ears again this past week when I was cutting and pulling sky vine (Thunbergia grandiflora) off my citrus trees. “It looks pretty,” they said. “It’ll jazz up the back fence with purple flowers,” they promised. “It’s not too bad to control.” File these under: fibs that plant friends have told me about vines.

Small deep wine-red fruits in a cluster on branch of green plantPlant of the Month: Wild Coffee — Wild coffee is a Florida native shrub that gets its name from the small red fruits it produces which resemble true coffee beans, the difference being that wild coffee’s fruits contain no caffeine. This shrub thrives in shade and is best grown in zones 9-11, as it is not cold-hardy. Aside from being attractive, wild coffee’s berries also attract birds and other wildlife, while the flowers are one of the nectar sources for the rare Atala butterfly found primarily in southeast Florida.

Very close view of a fire antFire Ants — Fire ants are notoriously painful pests. They build large nests, aggressively defend their areas, and are hard to get rid of. There are a variety of treatment options you can employ, and what is best for one landscape may not work well for another. Your local county Extension office can offer you the most individualized help. ((Photo of red imported fire ant by Pest and Diseases Image Library, Bugwood.org))

Orange flowers of crossandraAugust in Your Garden — With the heat of summer reaching its peak, the promise of more pleasant outdoor weather is just around the corner. You have a few options in terms of gardening; one is to continue planting your heat-tolerant flowers and herbs. Alternatively, you can wistfully admire your garden from the temperature-controlled comfort of your home, while planning for your fall garden when the temperatures truly begin to drop.

Read the full August issue.

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What to Plant in December – Infographic

Curly leafed kale in a mulched bed, by Caraline Stephens, UF/IFAS

Happy December’s eve, gardeners! Since the cool season is Florida’s busiest vegetable gardening time, we wanted to share “What to Plant in December” as soon as possible.

There’s so much to plant this month! Leafy greens like arugula, collards, mustard, and Swiss chard; cruciferous vegetables along broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. In South Florida, there’s so much you can plant, it would almost be easier to list what you can’t plant (strawberries, for example).

Illustration listing what edibles to plant in December for Florida

For detailed, text-based information, you can rely on our UF/IFAS gardening publications. These publications are on the UF/IFAS Solutions for Your Life website, and give Florida gardeners a monthly guide for what to plant and do in their gardens; they include links to even more of our gardening resources, all based on University of Florida research and expertise. Three different editions of the calendar provide specific tips for each of Florida’s climate zones—North, Central, and South.

If you would like a printable version of this infographic, you can download it here:
http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/planting_december_graphic.pdf

Happy winter gardening! (Or perhaps we should say, “winter” gardening.)

The featured header photo is curly kale, by Caraline Stephens, UF/IFAS.

 

 

 

Mosquito Control and Bees

Honey bee on orange blossomThere are some bugs you just don’t want around, like mosquitoes. Mosquito control protects the public from disease outbreaks, reduces nuisance mosquitoes, and protects Florida’s economy.

But then there are the bugs you do want around, like bees. It’s no exaggeration to say that almost everyone who eats food benefits from the honey bee. A common estimate is that one in three U.S. crops is pollinated by bees, but in Florida the ratio is three out of four.

So, how do mosquito control efforts affect our honey bees? The UF/IFAS Center for Public Issues Education (PIE Center) addresses that in a new campaign to educate Floridians on mosquito control:

While insecticides used on mosquitoes can kill bees outside of their hives, treatment that is applied before dawn or after dusk can reduce impact because bees are usually inside their hives. However, it is not always appropriate to treat before dawn or after dusk for certain mosquito species. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, studies show that honey production between hives in treated and untreated sites did not show significantly different quantities of honey over the course of a season. Beekeepers and concerned citizens should work with their local mosquito control program to determine when and where they treat for mosquitoes.

They’ve created a very helpful fact sheet that you can download and print:
http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/pdf/mosquito_control_bee_impact_piecenter.pdf

Impact of Mosquito Control on Honey Bees
An infographic with some of the information from the PIE Center’s fact sheet titled, “Impact of Mosquito Control on Honey Bees,” in an illustrated format.

And you can read more about honey bees in Florida in this excellent article written for UF/IFAS Extension Bug Week 2018.

Prevent & Protect

It’s summer, and in Florida that means mosquitoes. The American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) has declared June 24 – June 30 as National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, which makes it a pretty good time to talk about what we can do as individuals to control mosquitoes in our community.

One way we can prevent mosquito-borne diseases is by eliminating standing water from around our homes. Did you know that as little as one bottlecap of water standing for five days is enough for mosquitoes to develop? Standing water can be found in places like birdbaths, tarps, flower pots, tires, kid pools, and even in some plants like bromeliads.

Infographic listing sources of standing water around the home

 

Learn more about how you can prevent & protect at UF/IFAS Gardening Solutions.

 

May Brings the Heat

Happy May, gardeners! As temperatures rise, thoughts turn to summer vegetable gardening. Southern favorites to plant now in North and Central Florida include Swiss chard, okra, and sweet potatoes. In addition to sweet potatoes, South Florida gardeners might consider boniato, hot peppers, and tropical “spinach” such as Sisso, Malabar, and New Zealand.

 

edibles_may

May is also a good time to start preparing for hurricane season. Start by checking trees for damaged or weak branches and prune if needed. If you’re looking for a pro, hire an ISA-certified arborist.

For more information and resources, visit the UF/IFAS Gardening Solutions website.