• Archives

  • Tweets

The Neighborhood Gardener – January 2017

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Happy New Year!

Cupcake with candlesCelebrating 100 – The December issue was our 100th edition of the Neighborhood Gardener. The first Neighborhood Gardener newsletter went out in August 2008. Since then our subscribership has flourished, we have sent out hundreds of informational pieces, and promoted as many local and state gardening events. We hope that you’ve enjoyed the information we’ve shared and we look forward to sharing another 100 newsletters with you in the coming years.

Peach on the treePruning Mature Deciduous Fruit Trees – Pruning is an important part of deciduous fruit tree maintenance. There are two training systems that will depend on the type of tree you’re growing and will dictate how you need to prune. Now is the time to plan for pruning and possibly make cuts to your tree, assuming the danger of a freeze has passed for your area. Check out our piece and the linked EDIS articles for the information you need to prune your tree properly for the best crop yield.

Wendy WilberWendy’s Wanderings — Florida’s Arbor Day is celebrated every year on the third Friday of January. This month it is January 20th, so mark your calendar to plant a tree or to help someone else plant a tree. Florida’s Arbor Day is held a little earlier than the national day—celebrated in April—because January is a great time to plant a tree in Florida and our soil isn’t frozen like many other states.

Creamy white pinwheel shaped frangipani flower with yellow centerWinter-flowering Trees and Shrubs — The start of a new year brings flowers to many trees in the Sunshine State. January, and February for that matter, see many trees and shrubs flowering in the coldest parts of the year and on into the spring. Our monthly “What’s Flowering in Florida” infographics tell you what is in bloom each month; this piece will give you a little more information on the featured plants for January and February.

Foliage of Fortune's mahoniaPlant of the Month: Mahonia – Mahonia is the name of an entire genus of woody, evergreen shrubs with dozens of different species. A few of those species will grow well in north and central Florida gardens. Mahonia plants thrive in the shade and are drought tolerant once established. Both their yellow flowers in winter and blue-purple berries in the spring will add some unusual interest to the landscape. Foliage varies with each species, from holly-like and spiky to delicate and feathery.

Male green anole with dewflap showingAnoles – A competition for shelter and food is raging across Florida, and two related lizard species have been adapting to the presence of each other for decades. The native green anoles found themselves in competition with the Cuban brown anoles over a century ago. While not much can be done to eradicate brown anoles, having tall shrubs and trees in your landscape offers refuge for green anoles, as they move vertically in habitats when brown anoles are present.

Purple flowers of agapanthusJanuary in Your Garden – While it may be cold out, there are still many bulbs or annuals to plant. Bulbs like crinum and agapanthus can be planted throughout the state. Gardeners in North and Central Florida can also plant gloriosa lily bulbs, and those in South Florida can plant clivia lily this month. In North and Central Florida, annuals like pansy, viola, petunia, and snapdragon are great for planting this time of year. South Florida gardeners can plant begonia, browallia, lobelia, dianthus, dusty miller, and nicotiana.

Read the full January issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

Florida’s Arbor Day is January 15th

While National Arbor Day falls on the last Friday in April, many states observe their own Arbor Day depending on the best tree-planting times for the region. Florida celebrates Arbor Day on the third Friday of January, the 15th this year.

You can celebrate Arbor Day by planting a young tree in your landscape or helping with tree plantings in your community. Trees can reduce home energy costs and raise the value of your property, while adding shade and visual interest to your landscape.

Learn more about planting and establishing trees at UF/IFAS Extension’s Gardening Solutions.

Local Extension offices and other community program often hold tree giveaway events for Arbor Day; check with your local Extension office to find out.

The Neighborhood Gardener – January 2016

Happy New Year, gardeners!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Luke ConnorAnd the Winner is… – Congratulations to the 2015 Outstanding Master Gardener, Luke Connor of Marion County. In only six years of service, Luke has already volunteered nearly 1,000 hours, served in multiple leadership roles, and even taught agriculture to soldiers in the U.S. Army Reserve.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — This is the month that we resolve to make changes in our lives for the better. For a happier and healthier 2016, why not make some landscaping and gardening resolutions? I always look for some easy things to quickly mark off my list, so for my first “Wanderings” column of 2016, I thought I might share a few simple landscaping resolutions.

Packaged suet with cageSuet is for the Birds — Suet cakes are a great source of high-energy animal fat and protein for the birds in your landscape. While they’re widely available for purchase and not that expensive, making your own allows you to customize the flavors and have some fun in the process.

Head of cabbageCrazy for Cabbage — Get your new year gardening off to a healthy and productive start by planting a little cabbage this January. A member of the Brasicaeae family, cabbage is related to broccoli, collards, and Brussels sprouts. These winter veggies thrive in the cold; in fact, they require cool temperatures in order to grow. Cabbage can be eaten raw in cole slaw, pickled in sauerkraut, or cooked into a variety of dishes. Plus it’s high in vitamins, particularly vitamin C.

Pink camelliaPlant of the Month: Camellia — Camellias flower in the fall and winter when their display of colorful blooms is most appreciated. During the remainder of the year, their evergreen foliage and relatively slow growth make camellias excellent landscape plants. Many Florida gardeners aren’t aware of the sheer number of camellia varieties available. Most camellias will perform best if you plant them in a sheltered location where they receive partial shade, in a well-drained, preferably acidic soil. Any pruning should be done before late summer when the flower buds form.

woman planting a treeJanuary in Your Garden – Florida observes Arbor Day on the third Friday of January. To celebrate, plant a tree in your yard or community. Consider a hurricane resistant tree such as live oak, bald cypress, cabbage palm, or crapemyrtle.

Closeup of a river birch's barkWinter Interest: Bark Appeal — It can be a challenge to add interest to your landscape for winter. Choosing trees that have unusual or interesting bark can bring dashes of texture and even color to your landscape during the less spectacular gardening months.

Read the full January issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – January 2015

Happy New Year, gardeners!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Cold Weather Protection – The cold weather is here, and if you haven’t already, it’s time to start thinking about how you’ll protect your plants this winter. Be ready to move tender potted plants to warmer sheltered areas if a freeze or frost is predicted. Also, check your inventory of plant covers and frost blankets so that you’ll be prepared when the time comes.

 

concrete birdbathBirdbaths — You can kick off the New Year by adding a splash of color and water to your landscape with a birdbath! While you’ll find lots of birdbaths made of gray concrete, many are made today in bright colors and interesting designs. When selecting your birdbath remember, birds prefer those with textured bottoms, gently sloping sides, and water no deeper than two to three inches in the middle.

 

air plantPlant of the Month: Air Plant — When people use the term “air plant,” they’re usually referring to Tillandsia spp. Most species of Tillandsia have thin, stiff leaves covered in scales, often giving them a fuzzy, gray-green appearance. Since they anchor themselves to something other than soil, air plants can grow on or in a variety of creative surfaces like glass globes, shells, or laid on a bed of dry pebbles in a shallow dish. Air plants are incredibly low-maintenance, requiring only light, air circulation, and an occasional light mist of water.

 

January in Your Garden – The third Friday in January is Arbor Day for Florida. You can celebrate by planting a tree in your landscape or community. Consider planting a hurricane-resistant tree like live oak, bald cypress, cabbage palm, or crapemyrtle, ensuring you’ll have a tree to enjoy for years to come.

wolf spiderFriend or Foe? Friend: Carolina Wolf Spider — The sight of a Carolina wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis) may startle you, but these eight legged critters are actually great hunters and feed on insects in your home or landscape. These spiders are between 1 and 1½ inches long and are one of the largest spiders in the US. Their size is just one reason these spiders sometimes cause alarm; the other reason people fear them is a case of mistaken identity. Carolina wolf spiders are often confused with the brown recluse, a much smaller spider (between ¼ and ¾ inch long), rarely found in Florida.

Read the full January issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

Happy New Year! The Neighborhood Gardener – January 2014

Happy New Year, gardeners!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

tree plantingJanuary 17 is Florida’s State Arbor Day — While National Arbor Day falls on the last Friday in April, many states observe their own Arbor Day depending on the best tree-planting times for the region. Florida celebrates Arbor Day on the third Friday of January, the 17th this year. You can celebrate Arbor Day by planting a young tree in your landscape or helping with tree plantings in your community. Trees can reduce home energy costs and raise the value of your property, while adding shade and visual interest to your landscape.

Charles ReynoldsOutstanding Master Gardener Nominee — Each year Master Gardeners from around the state are nominated to receive the Outstanding Master Gardener Award at the annual state conference. This award recognizes an individual who has made outstanding efforts in several Master Gardener projects and activities. The 2013 Outstanding Master Gardener Award went to Linda Krausnick of Marion County. There were a number of wonderful nominees this year, and this month we would like to focus on Charles Reynolds of Highlands County.

KalePlant of the Month: Kale — Kale is a dark-green leafy vegetable that can be grown during the winter months in Florida. It’s often referred to as a “superfood” because it’s rich in iron, calcium, and vitamins A, C, and K. Kale (Brassica oleracea L.) can be started from seed anytime from September through January or February. Be sure to plant it in a sunny spot and water regularly. To ensure success, pick Florida-friendly varieties like ‘Vates Dwarf Blue Curled’, ‘Tuscan’, ‘Winterbor’, and ‘Redbor’.

January in Your Garden – January is the last month in most areas of the state to plant cool season crops like beets, broccoli, cabbage, and turnips. Now is also a great time to prune non-spring flowering shrubs and trees to improve their form.

Tea scale on leafFriend or Foe? Foe: Tea Scale — Tea scale is a major camellia and holly pest in Florida. It appears as a fuzzy whitish coating on the bottom of leaves and causes yellow speckling on top. Tea scale is a difficult pest to control due to its habit of primarily infesting the underside of leaves, making spray coverage difficult. You can manage the tea scale problems in your landscape with horticultural oil products or choose a systemic product for season long protection.

Read the full January issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.