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The Neighborhood Gardener – June 2016

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

figsFig Trees – Native to the Mediterranean, the edible fig (Ficus carica) has been cultivated and enjoyed for centuries. Figs ripen on the tree and don’t ship well, so the best way to truly enjoy a fresh fig is from your local market, or better yet, your own fig tree. Luckily, Florida offers the right growing conditions and figs are fairly easy to grow in north and central Florida.

A rocky landscape, photo courtesy of Kim GableLandscaping on the Rocks – Monroe County, which includes the Florida Keys, presents some unique gardening challenges, even by Florida standards. While gardeners there have to deal with the heat, humidity, and the threat of hurricanes like the rest of the state, their location presents its own issues and opportunities.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — With the concerns about Zika virus all over the news, we’ve been recommending that you regularly scout your landscape for possible water-gathering sites and eliminating them. I decided to take a quick survey of my landscape to see if I had any mosquito-breeding containers in the yard. I want to keep the mosquito population as low as possible, for my health and the health of my neighbors.

Photo of rubber mulch by Phasmatisnox at English WikipediaRubber Mulch: Not a Florida-Friendly Choice — Choosing the right mulch for your landscape can be a bit overwhelming; so many organic and inorganic options exist that it can be difficult to know where to start. While you may be tempted to give rubber mulch a try, there are some facts about this option that need to be carefully considered. As you decide which mulch belongs in your landscape beds, consider passing on the rubber mulch. Organic mulches, while not long lasting, are great for improving your soil quality.

pickerel weed flowerPlant of the Month: Pickerel Weed — Pickerel weed (Pontederia cordata) is an aquatic native plant found throughout Florida. This perennial is usually found in shallow wetland areas or around the edges of lakes and ponds. Purple-blue flower spikes can be seen several weeks after the appearance of the shiny, lance-shaped foliage. Individual flowers last only a day, but this repeat bloomer can be enjoyed from spring through fall. Pickerel weed is usually purchased in containers and should be planted in full-sun locations with about a foot of water.

Uprooted treeJune in Your Garden – Hurricane season kicked off on June 1, and with three named storms already this year, now is the time to make sure that your landscape is hurricane ready. The 2016 season is expected to be pretty active, so take a look at your trees and see if pruning is necessary. Always prune appropriately—that means not over-pruning.

mole cricketMole Crickets — An easy way to determine whether there are mole crickets in your yard is to mix liquid dishwashing soap into water and pour the mixture over turf. You should be able to see mole crickets not long after your soapy water application. See this quick demonstration video from Adam Dale, assistant professor of turfgrass and ornamental entomology at the University of Florida, on his Twitter feed (may not play on all browsers).

Read the full June issue.

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The Neighborhood Gardener – June 2015

Happy Summer Gardening!

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

The 34th Annual State Master Gardener Conference – The highly anticipated State Master Gardener Conference will take place October 18-21, 2015. Whether this year’s conference will be your first or fifteenth, there will be something for all of Florida’s Master Gardeners. In addition to 24 educational sessions, there will be exciting keynote speakers including John Moran, one of Florida’s best landscape photographers.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — This month marks the beginning of summer. For Floridians, there are a lot of markers to the month of June—hurricane season, the end of the school year, the rainy season starting, and reaping the harvest of our spring gardens.

Uprooted treeRisky (Tree) Business — Making sure the trees surrounding your home are healthy is always important. Not only are unhealthy trees unattractive, they can be a serious safety hazard. But it’s equally important to remember that not all trees are a risk; they play a vital role in your landscape. The best way to determine if your trees are healthy is to contact a professional. But you can do some scouting in your own landscape and determine if some of your trees are a risk and should be looked at.

OleanderPlant of the Month: Oleander — Oleander (Nerium oleander) may have a bit of a bad-girl reputation, but it is a truly beautiful addition to the Florida landscape. All parts of the plant are toxic, so be sure to plant it far from small children and curious pets. Oleander will grow best in zones 9a-11 and can handle even the poorest of soils. Plant yours in full sunlight for ideal flowering, and while it is very drought-resistant, supplemental irrigation in the driest months will help your oleander thrive.

June in Your Garden – Many gardeners are wrapping up their spring garden harvests as temperatures start to climb. Cover crops are a great way to control weeds and add nutrients to the soil while you take a break from tending to your vegetable patch. Cowpeas, sunhemp, and sorghum are some popular annual summer cover crops.

caterpillarFriend or Foe? Foe: Oleander Caterpillars — Oleander moths are quite beautiful.They’re sometimes called polka-dot moths due to the spots on their bodies and wings. But it’s the larval stage you should keep an eye out for. Oleander caterpillars are voracious eaters and can quickly defoliate a plant. Removing larvae-infested foliage is the most environmentally friendly method of control.

Read the full June issue.

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The Neighborhood Gardener – June

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

• A Better Lawn on Less Water — Don’t let water restrictions worry you. Proper use of an automatic irrigation system can keep your lawn beautiful without wasting water.
• Quick vs. Slow Release Fertilizer — Quick-release fertilizers are often used for plants with high nutrient needs, like vegetables or annuals, but overall, it’s often better to choose the “slow option.”
• Competing in the Plant ID & Judging Contest? Are you assisting a 4-H judging team for the plant ID competition in July? Or organizing an MG team for the competition in October? Check out the Florida Plant Identification Module to help you with your “plant ID” skills.
• Plant of the Month: Cleome — These heat-loving annuals produce distinctive, spidery flowers in a variety of colors and can grow up to five feet tall. Cleome has long been popular in Southern gardens for its ability to bloom all summer long.
• June in Your Garden — Annuals that can take full sun during the increasingly hot summer months include celosia, portulaca, vinca, melampodium, blue salvia, and some coleus.
• Friend or Foe: Nematodes — These microscopic worms can wreak havoc on your plants.
• Master Gardener Specialist Update — The how, what, and why of consumer insecticides.
• Are You a Fan? Stay up to date with the Florida Master Gardener Page on Facebook.

Read the June issue.

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