• Archives

  • Tweets

The Neighborhood Gardener – April 2017

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Happy spring, gardeners!

Oranges cut into chunksNatural Pest Control with Oils – Growing interest in organic gardening, coupled with risks associated with traditional synthetic products, has increased attention to natural products that can manage landscape and garden pests. Plant- and petroleum-derived oils are one group of natural pest control products that can be successfully used in your garden. They’re typically used to target soft-bodied pests like caterpillars or aphids. We go through the options, how they’re used, and what to watch out for.

Artistic rendering of the words International Flower and Garden FestivalEpcot Flower and Garden Festival – Spring is in full swing and the Epcot International Flower and Garden Festival blooms on. Running now through May 29th, the festival features fun Disney-themed topiaries, gorgeous gardens, and special events in the Festival Center on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, including instructional seminars from University of Florida experts.

Wendy WilberWendy’s Wanderings — My grandmother always made sure she had her trusty Farmers’ Almanac close at hand whenever she was making any gardening decision. To make their forecasts, the authors of the Farmers’ Almanac claim to use a “secret formula that is locked in a black box.” I prefer to use more updated forecast projections that are based on transparent science by meteorologists, and I would encourage you to do the same.

Small red tomatoesPlant of the Month: Cherry Tomatoes – Cherry tomatoes are ideal for the hot and steamy Florida garden. While large tomatoes have a brief planting season here, cherry tomatoes can provide you with fruit throughout the heat of summer. Cherry tomatoes have the same growing requirements as their larger cousins: four to six hours of sunlight per day, regular fertilization, and one to two inches of water a week. There are quite a few varieties which grow well in Florida gardens including ‘BHN 268’, ‘Black Cherry’, ‘Yellow Pear’, and ‘Sun Gold’ to name a few.

Yellow male cloudless sulphur butterflyCloudless Sulphur Butterfly – A pretty butterfly with an odd name, the cloudless sulphur is one of Florida’s most common. These small yellow butterflies have long tongues, perfect for sipping nectar from the tubular flowers of plants like scarlet creeper and scarlet sage. Cloudless sulphur caterpillars are usually green with yellow and blue markings; their host plants include several “sensitive plant” species and shrubs in the Senna group, such as candlestick plant.

Coleus plant with deep red leavesApril in Your Garden – April is a great time to plant heat-tolerant annuals like coleus and bulbs like cannas. This is also a good time to divide large clumps of ornamental grasses and bulbing plants. Edibles that can be planted throughout the state this month include sweet potatoes, southern peas, and beans (bush, pole, and lima).

Yellow flower of coreopsisGrow Your Own Dyes – Growing plants that can be used for the ancient art of creating natural dyes at home is suddenly trending again. For thousands of years, people have looked to plants for color: for clothing, art materials, and more. Luckily, Florida gardeners have a number of colorful options for providing dye-making materials that can also add beauty and even food to the landscape. Of course, many plants can be used to make green dye, but there’s much more color in the garden.

Read the full April issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

The Neighborhood Gardener – October 2015

Master Gardeners,

There’s still time to register for the 34th State Master Gardener Conference, October 18-21 in Kissimmee. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to hear our keynote speaker, photographer John Moran, or attend some of the 24 concurrent educational sessions.

This month in The Neighborhood Gardener:

Pink dianthus flowerCut Flowers for Cool Weather – While thinking about all the yummy veggies you can grow and harvest in the fall, don’t forget about flowers! While most won’t be destined for your plate (although the pansies could be), flowers can still be harvested—for vases around your home. Bring some floral autumnal fun indoors with cool season bedding plants like dianthus (pictured), calendula, and more.

WendyWendy’s Wanderings — This month we’re reporting on the Oriental fruit fly and the state of emergency associated with the insect in South Florida. You may think, “This doesn’t impact my garden or my landscape personally, so why should I care?” But as Floridians I think we should always care when there is a threat to our agriculture industry and our Florida farmers.

Map showing heavy rain for FloridaEl Niño — You may have heard that El Niño is back in the tropical Pacific Ocean, but what does that mean for your garden? El Niño events bring Florida a cooler and wetter winter, meaning you may find yourself dealing with more fungal diseases on plants, increased nutrient loss in the garden, and changes in the production of deciduous fruits, among other things

Yellow mumsPlant of the Month: Chrysanthemums — While the leaves of most Florida trees won’t give us those traditional autumnal colors, we can still paint our landscape with the colors of fall. Chrysanthemums, or mums, are easy to grow and come in a range of warm, welcoming hues. When buying potted mums, look for healthy, well-shaped plants with many flower buds. These perennials are cold hardy and prefer full sun, but can also thrive with just morning or afternoon sun.

October in Your Garden – October is a great time to be planting in the vegetable garden. Many herbs and vegetables thrive during Florida’s mild winter. What better way to know what to plant this and every month than with a handy-dandy infographic. See what vegetables to plant, broken down by area of the state.

Oriental fruit flyFriend or Foe? Foe: Oriental Fruit Fly — The Oriental fruit fly infestation in Miami-Dade County has become a problem warranting the declaration of a state of agricultural emergency. While this may not directly impact your home garden at the moment, an infestation here in Florida could be devastating. Read more about the Oriental fruit fly and what is being done to keep this aggressive pest in check by visiting Fresh from Florida.

Read the full October issue.

Or subscribe today, and receive it directly by e-mail.

Beat the Heat!

2010 has brought record temperatures to Florida!  As we’re working in our yards, we need to be aware of the heat and take precautionary measures.  Here’s an excerpt from a Solutions for Your Life article that gives some tips on heat.

Summer in Florida can be overwhelmingly hot, even for long-time residents. Heat stress, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke are illnesses that can overcome you when your body is unable to cool itself.

Are Your Trees Ready for Hurricane Season?

The hurricane season for Florida begins June 1, so now is the time to have your trees checked by a certified arborist.  Research has shown that trees pruned correctly survive heavy storms better than neglected trees.

We’ve all seen the destruction hurricanes can wreak on Florida’s homes and landscapes. To minimize your chances of getting hurricane damage, hire a certified arborist to prune your trees before the hurricane season.

The arborist will remove dead branches that can fall on houses, cars, and people. They’ll shorten overly long branches and eliminate branches with cracks and those that are poorly attached to the tree.

Branches with the same diameter as the trunk will be shortened and the outer edge of the canopy will be thinned, making your tree less likely to be blown over. Low branches that are close to your roof should be removed or shortened, as well.

Be sure to have your trees evaluated by a professional every two years.

Check out Trees and Hurricanes for more information about prepping and  pruning your trees for hurricanes.

Helping Your Lawn Survive the Chill

Certainly when we think of living in Florida, we do not generally think about losing our lawns to freezing temperatures. However, some homeowners in Florida may find themselves needing to replace portions of their lawn in the spring of 2010 due to the cold weather. Here are some tips about how to prevent or reduce winterkill by preparing your lawn for the winter months and how to let your lawn recover from the big chill with minimal damage.  Read more.